Lansdowne Crescent Primary School

Lansdowne Crescent Primary School turns 100 in 2016!

In between now and then we are gathering as much information to have a big celebration.

If you have stories, memories, memorabilia or anything else which you feel would be of interest, please let us know so that we can make the anniversary as memorable as possible. Add your comment below 🙂

Official School Web Site – https://education.tas.edu.au/lansdownecrescentprimary/default.aspx

Parent Information Book Click here

13 Responses to Lansdowne Crescent Primary School

  1. irene miller says:

    my father who is 95yrs attended Lansdowne Crescent school often tells us stories of his time there.

  2. Greg Jackson says:

    My recollection is a little different from that of my friend John Berry.
    As I recall, Miss Hughes (Lucy) was the sister of Mrs Seabrook. They lived together at the bottom of Liverpool St either on the current Menzies site or further east, now part of the roundabout.
    Miss Hughes, of very slight stature, would jump off the dais when administering the cane, to get more force.
    I was in her grade 4 in 1949 and either in that year or later in Grade 6 – (not sure) she would get a couple of boys to bag the grass clippings from the ‘rec’ after mowing by council. We’d then get on the tram, take them to her house and return – usually during a late afternoon class as I recall.
    I stand to be corrected on all the above but they are my memories.
    Greg Jackson

  3. geoffrey oakes says:

    Greg, I and my sister also Pam were the victims of Miss Hughes. I am 70 years old now and my memories of Lucy and her sister are vivid.I also remember Mr. Young who put the fear of God into me when I was out of line.

  4. Kathryn Richardson (née Moir) says:

    My brother, sister and I all attended LCSS during the early fifties/sixties and I left for high school in 1960 from Mr Potter’s Grade 6 class. There is no comparison between primary education of that era and that which our children and grandchildren enjoy today. But, we knew nothing different, having open fires in the classroom (!), the milk bottles in crates, writing with pen and ink, and so the list goes on. I was always quite happy there and the teachers were, for the most part, caring and kind. By the way, I still have a book that was never returned to the “library cupboard” if anyone is interested! I also have two class photos from 1957 and 1958 (digitised), as well as one from St Michael’s Kindergarten, most of the pupils from here went on to LCSS.

    Kathryn Richardson (née Moir)

    • Liz Page says:

      I have just made a comment on West Hobart /LCSS site. You may be interested to read it.
      Liz Page (Jones)

    • Ann de Kleijn says:

      Greetings Kathryn, was feeling a bit nostalgic,and came across The West Hobart site.
      It has been many years, lived across from you in Faraday Street. Please can you give my greetings to your Family, especial your Mum.
      Ann de Kleijn (nee Hollick)

  5. geoffrey Oakes says:

    I am 70 years old so I guess I was a bit before you. I remember Mr. Potter, The Hughes sisters, Mrs Jones etc etc. My late sister Pam Oakes attended LC before me.Fond memories.

  6. Liz Page says:

    Kathryn, I lived in Forbes Ave not far from your house with my grandmother Clarice Kirby. I remember your family well. I attended LCSS from 1952 – 1956. Teachers were 1A Mrs. Curran, 1B Mrs. Seabrook, Grade 2 Mrs. Jones, gr. 3 Mrs. Seabrook, gr. 4 Miss Hughes and gr. 5 Mr. Trail (headmaster). Mrs. Jones washed out the mouth of a classmate with sandsoap because he swore. I remember his name to this day! Miss Hughes caned me over the fingers for doing back-hand copperplate writing. Other teachers were all kind.

    Liz Page ( nee Jones)

  7. Kathryn Richardson says:

    Hello Liz , I do remember you (and your sister Lynette) and the Kirby family, in fact David is still in touch with my mother. I remember most of the the names of the teachers listed, but you were ahead of me a bit. Do you remember having your fingernails checked for cleanliness? If they didn’t meet the standard, students were sent outside to find a sharp stick to clean them with. Classes were so spartan compared to today, with little to adorn the classroom in the way of teaching aids etc. Totally another era. I look forward to revisiting for the Centenary.

    Kathryn Richardson (née Moir)

    • Liz Page says:

      Definitely spartan classrooms. Went to Waimea Heights for gr.6 and was surprised how modern and light the classrooms were. Can remember assembly, singing God save the Queen and Onward Christian Soldiers. Don’t recall the fingernail regime. I live in NSW so not sure I will be visiting for centenary, last visited Hobart Christmas 2015. We had 15 at Alison’s for Christmas dinner. Remember me to your Mum.

      Liz Page

  8. Liz Page says:

    Correction 1 A teacher Mrs. Seager

    Liz Page

  9. sueandbiddy says:

    I was at LCSS in the early sixties as it started to modernize its approaches-Mrs Smith had us using cuisenaire in Grade 3, Mr De Clifford took us on excursions including the TSO. We learnt cord cursive handwriting listening to Miss Braithwaite sing over the PA. There was a real mix of kids there- locals, kids of newly arrived migrant families and of course the Kennerly Boys.

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