Welcome to West Hobart

View from Knocklofty

So you’ve just arrived in your rocket ship from outer space and it has plonked you  in West Hobart.

It certainly looks a reasonable place to set up camp; but what’s here and how do you find things? You must have a host of unanswered questions.

  • Where do I get food and what’s available?
  • Where should I live?
  • Which night is rubbish collected?
  • Is there a school nearby?
  • Are there any baby-sitters?
  • How often do buses run?
  • What community organisations exist?
  • Where is there a doctor?
  • What is that building?
  • What used to be here?
  • Where are the parks?
  • Who else is interested in basket weaving?
  • Where do I get petrol?
  • Are there any good restaurants?

And so the list could go on.
This web site is being set up to allow information about West Hobart to be shared.

There is so much history about West Hobart but where does one go to access it easily?

There are so many stories about residents past and present which deserve to be recorded for posterity. Unless a start is made soon, it may well be too late and the opportunity may disappear.

If you have an idea for recording our history, some expertise to offer or a suggestion to make the whole ordeal simpler we’d really appreciate your contribution.
Topics might include

  • The old K&D Brick Works at the top of Arthur St
  • Rory Jack’s escapades – old paper clippings and links to more information
  • Various parks in the suburb
  • Special interest Groups in West Hobart eg WHEN, NHW, Scouts, craft etc.
  • Successful Businesses

Just drop me a line at paul.turvey@gmail.com or send me a message in the “reply” box below




8 Responses to Welcome to West Hobart

  1. Chris says:

    The cemetery which used to be bounded by Hill Street, Adelaide Street, and Butterworth Street should rate a mention. It operated from 1840 until Cornelian Bay opened in 1872.

    The number 32 tram that ran prior to the Great War is probably worthy of comment as well

    • Helen says:

      I have an index of burials for the Hill St Wesleyan cemetery that was published a few years ago and was compiled by Rosemary Davidson.
      As I was brought up in Hamilton Street, my mother told us about the cemetery, the idea of a burial ground just down the road was fasinating, but the idea of the houses being built on the ground was a bit scary to a youngster!. I think some of the headstones were put into the park in Melifont Street.

      Helen

      • Brian De La Pierre says:

        Hi Helen, My GGGGM Francis Mary Conliffe born C 1787 before the First Fleet sailed was buried Hill St, 31 Jan 1852. Was her husband John Conliffe buried in the same cemetery? He died 27 June 1854 at Hobart Town aged about 71.
        Is there a 12 day old male Conliffe, born 14 Sept 1854 also there?
        Would be grateful for your assistance.
        Kind regards, Brian.

      • Chris says:

        Frances Mary Conliffe died on 28 January 1852 age 65. She was described as a widow of a carpenter. The informant was George Flexmore of Sandy Bay who was described as a friend but I suspect was a relative.. I can find no record of John’s death or burial. The death of an unnamed male child on 14 September 1854 is recorded but there is no record of a burial at Hill Street. He could have been the child of Charles Conliffe & Elizabeth nee Flexmore

  2. tasteach says:

    What a great idea, Paul! I have done something similar with a wiki about Sorell but have done it with students from the school doing the research and inputting the data. Interviewing residents and taken photos is one way students could be involved in this as part of their History courses. Here is a link to our wiki. https://sorelltas.wikispaces.com/

  3. Di E says:

    This looks great,Paul. Can you make the link to WHEN go straight to our homepage? Thanks!

  4. Chris says:

    I think you’ll find that the park in Melifont Street has some connection with a burial ground for the Society of Friends commonly known as the Quakers. Rosemary’s book about the Hill Street Burial Ground makes it fairly clear that there are probably human remains still under the houses that never made it to Cornelian Bay

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